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SAWAP – GHANA

Ghana developed its strategic Investment Framework for Sustainable land Management in 2012 and identified the Sudan and Guinea Savannah zone of Ghana as most priority ecological target area due to land degradation. This area has the highest incidence of poverty and food insecurity and is the least climate resilient Ghana is currently implementing the Sustainable Land and Water Management Project (SLWMP ) which aims at supporting Sustainable Development Initiative for the Northern Savanna to realize the vision of a diversified and resilient economic zone in the north with significant regional environmental benefits. The Project officially started on January 2011 but credit effectiveness commence in October 2011 with a closing date in February 2018.

Photo-Ghana-5Component 1: activities under Component 1 progressed little in the last supervision period. Completion of two pre-feasibility studies for large scale multi use water infrastructure, the only activity outstanding under this component (financed by the original grant) was agreed to be dropped due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016 due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

Component 2: a planning exercise was completed in April 2016, involving all district agriculture directors and extension officers in the project target areas. Due to high turnover at the district director level (7 out of 10 district directors rotated out), the training included an additional day for bringing these new directors fully on board. All 46 watershed management plans were prepared and approved (5 communities in each of the “old” 88 districts and 3 communities in each of the “new” 29 districts). Subproject applications were received and assessed using the standard checklist (included as Anne 7). A total of 3,470 applications were received, including 2,214 from new communities and 1,256 from old communities – of these 2,06210 were approved, including 1,862 in old communities and 200 for PES auctions only in old communities. A training on watershed management planning was organized for 20 NGOs working in the project target area.
Component 3 : Procurement of inputs for approved sub-projects was initiated. Due to high demand, only sub-projects in new 46 communities were considered for approval, even if the Project received 1,256 subproject proposals from “old” communities. An exception was made for communities that had received support for composting in 2015 (they were considered for crop subprojects support to demonstrate benefits of compost utilization).
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Photo-Ghana-5Component 1: activities under Component 1 progressed little in the last supervision period. Completion of two pre-feasibility studies for large scale multi use water infrastructure, the only activity outstanding under this component (financed by the original grant) was agreed to be dropped due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016 due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

Component 2: a planning exercise was completed in April 2016, involving all district agriculture directors and extension officers in the project target areas. Due to high turnover at the district director level (7 out of 10 district directors rotated out), the training included an additional day for bringing these new directors fully on board. All 46 watershed management plans were prepared and approved (5 communities in each of the “old” 88 districts and 3 communities in each of the “new” 29 districts). Subproject applications were received and assessed using the standard checklist (included as Anne 7). A total of 3,470 applications were received, including 2,214 from new communities and 1,256 from old communities – of these 2,06210 were approved, including 1,862 in old communities and 200 for PES auctions only in old communities. A training on watershed management planning was organized for 20 NGOs working in the project target area.
Component 3 : Procurement of inputs for approved sub-projects was initiated. Due to high demand, only sub-projects in new 46 communities were considered for approval, even if the Project received 1,256 subproject proposals from “old” communities. An exception was made for communities that had received support for composting in 2015 (they were considered for crop subprojects support to demonstrate benefits of compost utilization).

Photo-Ghana-5Component 1: activities under Component 1 progressed little in the last supervision period. Completion of two pre-feasibility studies for large scale multi use water infrastructure, the only activity outstanding under this component (financed by the original grant) was agreed to be dropped due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016 due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

due to insufficient funding and delays in identifying sites suitable for pre-feasibility studies, and substituted with a reconnaissance survey. Detailed proposal with costing will be submitted for Bank review by June 30, 2016

Component 2: a planning exercise was completed in April 2016, involving all district agriculture directors and extension officers in the project target areas. Due to high turnover at the district director level (7 out of 10 district directors rotated out), the training included an additional day for bringing these new directors fully on board. All 46 watershed management plans were prepared and approved (5 communities in each of the “old” 88 districts and 3 communities in each of the “new” 29 districts). Subproject applications were received and assessed using the standard checklist (included as Anne 7). A total of 3,470 applications were received, including 2,214 from new communities and 1,256 from old communities – of these 2,06210 were approved, including 1,862 in old communities and 200 for PES auctions only in old communities. A training on watershed management planning was organized for 20 NGOs working in the project target area.
Component 3 : Procurement of inputs for approved sub-projects was initiated. Due to high demand, only sub-projects in new 46 communities were considered for approval, even if the Project received 1,256 subproject proposals from “old” communities. An exception was made for communities that had received support for composting in 2015 (they were considered for crop subprojects support to demonstrate benefits of compost utilization).
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